Female populations have been more numerous than male

17-01-2017 TJHelll
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According to a genetic study by German researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, female populations have been more numerous than men throughout the history of mankind.

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The research used a new technique to more accurately compare the Y chromosome inherited from the father with maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA. Specifically, the Y chromosome was compared with the mitochondrial DNA of 623 men from 51 populations and the analysis showed that there were more women than men before human migaran Africa and this demographic trend continued for almost all later migrations.

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Among the probable main causes of this trend polygyny, common practice in many cultures for which a male mates with several females counted. It has also influenced the fact that, in most societies, women tend to move to live with their husbands.

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This has resulted in them have brought greater genetic contribution than men to the world population.
The results confirmed previous findings, as when global human populations are compared, there are major genetic differences in the parental NRY in the mtDNA. However, these differences are not as great as previously thought, and the authors were surprised to notice a substantial change in the relative amounts of differentiation of mtDNA NRY against regionally.

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The study authors found that in African populations they studied had less paternal genetic diversity, which could be a direct result of the Bantu expansion to the east and southern Africa, which began some 3,000 years ago. In samples taken from America, initial results suggest a greater genetic diversity of the mother, indicating that fewer men than women among the original settlers.

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Mark Stoneking, Department of Evolutionary Genetics at the Max Planck Institute and one of the study authors, "the new sequencing technique eliminates previous biases and provides a rich source of information about our genetic history. It allows us to look more closely at the differences regional populations and provide information on the impact of the processes of sexual bias in human genetic variation. "